Author: Anthony Mandal

I'm Reader in Print and Digital Cultures, and Director of the Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research at Cardiff University. My research interests include Jane Austen, 19th-century fiction, the gothic, print culture and history of the book, and digital humanities. I have published books and essays on Austen, popular fiction and print culture, and have developed a number of literary databases. I'm currently working on various projects, including an encyclopaedia of gothic publishing during the Romantic period. I'm also one of the General Editors of the New Edinburgh Edition of the Works of Robert Louis Stevenson.

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CFP: WORD, IMAGE, DIGITAL, Cardiff University, 1 Nov 2016

A One-Day Symposium
Cardiff University, Tuesday, 1 November 2016

Keynote Speaker: Michaela Mahlberg (University of Birmingham)

Download the PDF Here: cfp-wordimagedigital

Cardiff University’s Digital Cultures Network is delighted to announce its first Symposium on Word, Image and the Digital. Word and image, and the interplay between them, remain under explored and under-theorised in the digital humanities, despite the creation of pioneering digital archives including The William Blake Archive, the Rossetti Archive and The Illustration Archive. There is a sense, however, in which the digital is not only ‘graphical’ (as Johanna Drucker reminds us), but also a space where the visual and textual are in constant dialogue.

We invite proposals of up to 300 words for 20-minute papers that explore any aspect of the dynamic between word, image and the digital, including demonstrations of current projects. The deadline for submission of abstracts is Monday, 3 October 2016. Please send proposals or enquiries to Michael Goodman (GoodmanMJ@cardiff.ac.uk). Attendance at the Symposium is free and limited to no more than 30 delegates. While non-speaking delegates are welcome, priority will be given to speakers. (more…)

Visiting Speaker, 26 Apr 2016: Andrew Nash on Samuel Beckett’s Murphy Notebooks

Andrew Nash (University of Reading) will be presenting his paper, ‘Six Notebooks in Search of an Editor: Samuel Beckett’s Murphy’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 26 April 2016. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 4.43, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
2015.08.nashIn 2013 the University of Reading was unexpectedly successful in acquiring at auction six manuscript notebooks which had for almost eighty years remained in private hands. The notebooks were those in which Samuel Beckett had written, over some ten months between August 1935 and June 1936, the first draft of what was finally to emerge in 1938 as his first published novel, Murphy. This talk will outline the unusual provenance history of this literary manuscript and discuss the status of the notebooks as commercialised, heritage and research objects. It will reflect on the experience of helping to transcribe and edit the notebooks, examining their distinctive material features which shed important new light on Beckett’s composition process and on the ‘archaeology’ of modern literary manuscripts more generally. (more…)

Visiting Speaker, 12 Apr 2016: Mary Hammond on the reception of Great Expectations

Mary Hammond (University of Southampton) will be presenting her paper, ‘Pip at the Fingerpost: Nineteenth-Century Urban–Rural Conflict and the Regional Reception of Great Expectations’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 12 April 2016. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 3.58, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
2015.07.hammondThis talk explores the surprisingly varied responses of contemporary reviewers to one of the key narrative turns in Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations (1860–61): the moment when Pip, the main character, leaves the rural marshes of Kent to begin a new life as a London gentleman. This scene has often been characterised by modern critics as a Miltonian moment of prelapsarian hubris which underpins the novel’s broader themes of selfish ambition and lifelong regret. But contemporary reviewers saw it—and the novel’s message—very differently, and the variety of their responses is remarkable. Metropolitan reviewers’ hostility towards Dickens’s unflattering portrayal of the urban upper classes contrasts sharply with the much more sympathetic stance taken in most regional newspapers. Many of these regional papers also reproduced pirated extracts carefully selected to highlight rural characters and interests and paint London in an unflattering light. This talk demonstrates how the reception history of the text points directly to a significant animus and rivalry in rural–urban perceptions, and points to the value of studying changing urban and regional responses to a literary work over time to enhance our understanding of the potential plurality of its impact, and of the ways in which relationships between the rural and the urban were perceived by contemporaries in an age of mass migration and rapid social change.
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Pickford

Media, Modernity and the Middlebrow

‘Secrets of the Film World’: Archives, Cinema Writing and Interwar Intermedia

Lisa Stead, Tuesday 1 Mar 2016, CEIR Seminar Series

The Centre was delighted to host Dr Lisa Stead earlier this month, whose paper addressed how women’s fictional writing, primarily from the 1930s, and other media forms, such as film and fan magazines, collectively produce a fascinating account of women’s experience of the cinema and of cinema-going in the interwar period.

Stead - 1

Dr Carrie Smith introduces Lisa’s paper

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Today’s CEIR paper by Lisa Stead, now at 6pm

Owing to a scheduling conflict, Lisa Stead’s paper—‘“Secrets of the Film World”: Archives, Cinema Writing and Interwar Intermedia’—will now take place at 6pm (for 6.10pm start) instead of 5.30pm. The venue is still Room 4.43 of the John Percival Building, and the talk will be followed by a wine reception. Apologies for the inconvenience.