Author: Anthony Mandal

I'm Professor of Print and Digital Cultures and Director of the Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research at Cardiff University. My research interests include Jane Austen, 19th-century fiction, the gothic, print culture and history of the book, and digital humanities. I have published books and essays on Austen, popular fiction and print culture, and have developed a number of literary databases. I'm currently working on various projects, including an encyclopaedia of gothic publishing during the Romantic period. I'm also one of the General Editors of the New Edinburgh Edition of the Works of Robert Louis Stevenson.

CEIR Speaker, 21 Feb 2017: Carrie Smith on Ted Hughes’s Birthday Letters

Carrie Smith (Cardiff University) will be presenting her paper, ‘Ted Hughes’s Birthday Letters: An Archive of Writing’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 21 February 2017. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.48, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
2016-05-smithThis paper will consider the manuscript drafts of British poet Ted Hughes’s final full-length collection Birthday Letters (1998). It will suggest that the proliferation of reported documents, photographs, journal entries and letters in the published collection is a result of Hughes’s re-encounter with these items when sorting through his late wife Sylvia Plath’s, and later his own, papers for sale. As a result Birthday Letters itself becomes a poetic archive curated by Hughes. From the opening poem, we are presented with accounts of documents that root the collection in the texture of real life. The collection works to preserve what will be lost when the papers are archived after his death; the memory-context of these photographs, drafts and objects. Hughes also provides incorrect biographical details throughout the collection. The substitution of an easily-checkable detail suggests that Hughes is creating a poetic archive of items that cannot be trusted; implying that poetry must always be questioned when mined for biography. The process of shaping his archive and literary legacy informs the collection’s focus on the fallibility of memory and the potential for documents and objects to deceive. The archive of papers tries to preserve the past, even as the arranging and destroying of the papers alters it; similarly in Birthday Letters, Hughes represents the past in poetry by using concrete items. He performs a synthesising of these items, akin to a researcher, by finding patterns in the papers. As this paper will show, the drafts of Birthday Letters form an archive of writing, placing the indeterminacy of the many variants of the manuscript page alongside the doubt over how to record a shared life in poetry.
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Reminder: Rosario Arias’s paper on Neo-Victorian materiality is tomorrow

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Visiting Speaker, 6 Feb 2017: Rosario Arias on Neo-Victorian Material Culture

Rosario Arias (Universidad de Málaga) will be presenting her paper, ‘Material Traces and Tactility in Neo-Victorian Literature and Culture’, at 5.30pm on Monday, 6 February 2017. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.47, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
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In the latest issue of the online journal Neo-Victorian Studies (9.1: 2016), devoted to neo-Victorianism and the stage, co-editors Beth Palmer and Benjamin Poore acknowledge the relevance that ‘the idea of haunting and hauntedness’ bears upon the field of neo-Victorian studies (1). Indeed, the pervasiveness of the Victorians in contemporary culture has been addressed through the master trope of haunting and spectrality, as many critics have noted. However, Cora Kaplan in Victoriana (2002) has aptly suggested that ‘[t]he Victorian as at once ghostly and tangible … [has] had a strong affective presence in modern Britain’. Therefore, time seems ripe for the consideration of the tangibility of Victorian traces and the traces of the Victorians in contemporary culture. In this talk, I will pay attention to the material side of the trace of the Victorian past, objects and things, as well as the overflow of the past into the present through sensorial materiality, in contemporary literature and culture. In so doing, I will focus on a selection of texts that illustrate the sensuous interplay between the Victorian past and today’s culture by employing critical approaches such as Thing theory, affective materiality and phenomenology.
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Visiting Speaker, 29 Nov 2016: Tom Abba on Ambient Literature

Tom Abba (University of the West of England) will be presenting his paper, ‘The Road to Ambient Literature’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 29 November 2016. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.03, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
2016-03-abbaAmbient Literature—a two year, AHRC funded research project undertaken by UWE Bristol, Bath Spa University and the University of Birmingham, did not suddenly appear fully formed within a funding application. The project, defined as an exploration of situated literary experiences, delivered by pervasive computing platforms, responding to the presence of a reader to deliver story, emerges from a body of work that has sought to address the form of digital texts, grammars of writing for new technologies and interventions into situated literary practice.

Six months into the project, UWE’s Tom Abba will discuss and assess the work that informed the initial development of the Ambient Literature proposal, including Circumstance’s These Pages Fall Like Ash and a Hollow Body, and map out the territory within which Ambient Literature operates. The underlying aim of the research project; the reification of frameworks, grammars and platforms for writing Ambient Literature; informs the commissioning of three new pieces of writing during the programme of work. Alongside these, smaller experiments are being used to work through initial findings and research questions as they arise. Tom will conclude by examining the ways in which the second of these—yesterday you’re still dreaming—worked with specificities of spoken word and situated storytelling to manipulate each reader’s perception of their experience. (more…)

Reminder: Emily Rohrbach’s talk on voice and dispossession is on later today

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