Author: Anthony Mandal

I'm Reader in Print and Digital Cultures, and Director of the Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research at Cardiff University. My research interests include Jane Austen, 19th-century fiction, the gothic, print culture and history of the book, and digital humanities. I have published books and essays on Austen, popular fiction and print culture, and have developed a number of literary databases. I'm currently working on various projects, including an encyclopaedia of gothic publishing during the Romantic period. I'm also one of the General Editors of the New Edinburgh Edition of the Works of Robert Louis Stevenson.

Visiting speaker, 24 Mar 2015: Gowan Dawson on Citizen Science

Gowan Dawson (University of Leicester) will be presenting his paper, ‘Constructing Scientific Communities: Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 24 March 2015. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.48.

Abstract
The ‘Constructing Scientific Communities: Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries’ project is an innovative collaboration between the Universities of Oxford and Leicester in partnership with the Natural History Museum, the Royal College of Surgeons and the Royal Society. The project explores, and contributes to, the growing movement of what has come to be known as ‘Citizen Science’, partly through working with contemporary scientists involved in the online Zooniverse network, but also through historical research into the networks and communities who contributed to science in the nineteenth century, at a period when divisions between professionals and amateurs were only just emerging. This paper will focus on the project’s historical research on scientific periodicals, examining the possibilities of drawing on historical understandings of the role of science journals in the nineteenth century’s information revolution to enhance citizen participation in science in the twenty-first century’s own digital revolution. (more…)

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Next event—How to Keep Your (Georgian) Man, 17 Mar 2015

Originally posted on CRECS//:

Our next CRECS event turns to the eternal question of sexuality, gender and domesticity in the eighteenth century. Christian Grey may be the man of the moment (unfortunately), but the Georgians had their own—characteristic, shall we say?—view of romance and sex, which might raise a few eyebrows even today. The literature, drama and art of the eighteenth century offer a range of views of sexual identity that is as complex and contradictory as our own, ranging from prudence to prurience, from respectability to rakishness.

Women, in particular, found themselves at the heart of a paradox. On the one hand, they were expected to comply with ideologies regarding the correct modes of female behaviour, which was always under scrutiny and strictly regulated. On the other hand, women were objects of unflinching male desire and transgressive passion: the controlling gaze of the father could transform into the illicit voyeurism of the lover.

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Visiting speaker, 24 Feb 2015: Holly Luhning on Eliza Haywood

Holly Luhning (University of Surrey) will be presenting her paper, ‘Eliza Haywood: Cultural and Corporeal Adaptation’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 24 February 2015. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.48.

Abstract
Eliza Haywood carefully crafted her public debut with the publication of Love in Excess (1719); as her career progressed she became an important innovator in the development of the novel. This talk will consider how Haywood first emerged in the literary marketplace, and move on to examine her often-neglected, but formally innovative mid-career, with particular focus on Adventures of Eovaai, and her translation of Crebillon’s Le Sopha. These two texts exemplify the depth and range of Haywood’s activities as a innovator of narrative and the novel, and of how her work as a translator (and also position of translatee) contributed not only to the rise of the novel, but also the spread of the novel. Haywood’s career, when considered as a whole, reveal her to be an a much more important cultural player in terms of the development of the novel than many ‘stories’ of the novel may suggest. (more…)

Our next event Cambrian CRECS is on this Tuesday!

Anthony Mandal:

Don’t forget! This is on tonight. All are welcome.

Originally posted on CRECS//:

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Next event—Cambrian CRECS: Nation, Region, Place in the Long 18th Century, 17 Feb 2015

Originally posted on CRECS//:

Gripped by Six Nations fever? Wondering which team will walk triumphant from the grassy field of combat in March? And can Wales recoup last week’s loss against England and secure their favoured status once again?

Well, CRECS can’t provide the answers to these questions, but we can certainly offer an interesting and enjoyable evening of discussion and debate on Wales, in which four speakers will offer a variety of perspectives on the nation’s relationship to the Romantic period. While exhaustive work has been done on the role played by Ireland and Scotland in shaping Romantic writing, far less critical attention has been paid to Wales, despite its significant presence during the period. Indeed, during the Romantic period, Wales was seen as the heart of sensibility by some, the home of the picturesque by others and the source of enduring myths about ‘native’ British culture by many.

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