Author: Anthony Mandal

I'm Reader in Print and Digital Cultures, and Director of the Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research at Cardiff University. My research interests include Jane Austen, 19th-century fiction, the gothic, print culture and history of the book, and digital humanities. I have published books and essays on Austen, popular fiction and print culture, and have developed a number of literary databases. I'm currently working on various projects, including an encyclopaedia of gothic publishing during the Romantic period. I'm also one of the General Editors of the New Edinburgh Edition of the Works of Robert Louis Stevenson.

Public Lecture, 2 Feb 2016: Sally Shuttleworth on Victorian phobias

Fears and Phobias in the Victorian Age

Professor Sally Shuttleworth (St Anne’s College, Oxford)

Tuesday, 2 February 5.30–6.30pm, John Percival Building, Lecture Theatre 203

*** Wine Reception from 5pm *** 

A Collaborative Interdisciplinary Study of Science, Medicine and the Imagination Research Group Seminar with support from the Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research and Wellcome Trust Cardiff ISSF Science Humanities Initiative.

Shuttleworth - phobiaIn this seminar the internationally renowned literature and science scholar Sally Shuttleworth will explore some of the medical, literary and cultural responses in the Victorian age to the perceived problems of stress and overwork, anticipating many of the preoccupations of our own era.

The late nineteenth century was an era preoccupied with fear, and the medical diagnosis of phobias.  The American psychologist, G. Stanley Hall, for example, identified no less than 138 different types of pathological fear.  In this talk, Sally will explore the intersection of cultural, literary and medical discourses of fear in the period, looking particularly at the impact of literary texts on emerging psychiatric theories of phobia.

Following her main talk, Sally will speak about the genesis of the ‘Diseases of Modern Life‘ project and the European Research Council grant that supports it. This is a chance to hear a leading scholar provide an insight into grant capture on the European stage.

Book your free ticket via Eventbrite using this link.

About Sally Shuttleworth

Sally Shuttleworth is Professor of English Literature at St Anne’s College, Oxford. ShuttleworthIn her most recent book, The Mind of the Child: Child Development in Literature, Science and Medicine, 1840–1900 (OUP, 2010), she looked at a range of literary texts, including Dickens, Brontë, Eliot, Meredith, James, Hardy and Gosse, in the light of the emerging sciences of child psychology and psychiatry, and the impact of evolutionary theory. She is currently extending her work on the interface of literature, science and culture with two large projects: ‘Diseases of Modern Life‘ and the large AHRC four-year grant in the field of Science and Culture, on ‘Constructing Scientific Communities: Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries’. She is working with Professor Gowan Dawson at the University of Leicester, and her colleague in Astrophysics at Oxford, Dr Chris Lintott, and partner institutions, the Natural History Museum, the Royal Society and the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons.

Reminder: Jennie Batchelor’s talk on The Lady’s Magazine tomorrow

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harding

The Covert Canon

The CIA and the Literary Canon: The Case of Encounter Magazine

Jason Harding, Tuesday 17 Nov 2015, CEIR Seminar Series

Roughly half an hour before Jason Harding (Durham University) arrived to give his paper on ‘The CIA and the Literary Canon: The Case of Encounter Magazine’, Anthony, Mikey and I were trying to think of a good hashtag for the talk’s live-feed on Twitter. HardingSeveral suggestions were made, including #HardingCIA, or simply #CIA. Anthony, however, cautiously suggested that these could attract unwarranted attention from the organisation, who are, in fact, now users of the social network.

With over one million followers, at first it seems strange that America’s Central Intelligence Agency would make use of a platform that has, in the past, had significant cyber-security issues. The organisation’s Tweets, however, draw very little attention to their work, which leaves their posts quite uninteresting. (They frequently circulate facts about former US Presidents, and post photographs of combat aircraft and military uniforms.) Yet behind this unadventurous façade, their presence on Twitter does suggest covert observance or undercover surveillance, and there is, of course, no way of tracking which pages they frequently monitor. (more…)

Visiting Speaker, 1 Dec 2015: Jennie Batchelor on The Lady’s Magazine

Jennie Batchelor (University of Kent) will be presenting her paper, ‘“The world is a large volume”: The Lady’s Magazine and Romantic Print Culture’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 1 December 2015. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.01, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
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This talk examines the position of the Lady’s Magazine: or Entertaining Companion for the Fair Sex (1770–1832) in Romantic-era print culture and the scholarship surrounding it. Aside from the periodical’s extraordinary popularity and longevity, a number of ambitious claims have been made for the Lady’s Magazine’s historical and literary importance. Chief amongst these is Edward Copeland’s 1995 claim that the Lady’s Magazine defined women’s engagement with the world in the Romantic period. This argument is as seductive as it is unsubstantiated. Eighteenth-century periodicalists commonly overlook the title, which emerges after the often lamented if somewhat exaggerated demise of the essay-periodical epitomised by The Tatler and The Spectator. Romanticists, meanwhile, have tended to privilege the self-professedly ‘literary’ magazines of the turn of the century, in which writers such as Hazlitt and Scott, well known for their work in other more canonical genres, were involved.

This paper seeks to address this oversight by explicating how the magazine self-consciously and strategically positioned itself in relationship to the wider and highly competitive literary marketplace in which it thrived against the odds. In making these claims, I draw on initial research findings from our two-year Leverhulme-funded Research Project Grant: ‘The Lady’s Magazine (1770–1818): Understanding the Emergence of a Genre’. The project offers a detailed bibliographical, statistical and literary-critical analysis of one of the first recognisably modern magazines for women from its inception in 1770. In its three-pronged book history/literary critical/digital humanities approach, the project, like this talk, aims to answer two main research questions: 1) What made the Lady’s Magazine one of the most popular and enduring titles of its day?; 2) What effects might an understanding of the magazine’s content, production and circulation have upon own conceptions of Romantic-era print culture, a field still struggling fully to emerge from the shadows of canonical figures and genres? (more…)

Reminder: Jason Harding’s paper on the CIA and Encounter magazine tomorrow

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