conservation

Visiting speaker, 6 May 2014: Justin Tonra on Ossian Online

Justin Tonra (NUI Galway) will be presenting his paper, ‘Ossian Online: Building an Interdisciplinary Research Environment’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 6 May 2014. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.48.

Abstract
2013.08.tonraThis presentation will introduce the early stages of Ossian Online, a new research initiative to archive and edit James Macpherson’s profoundly influential work of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century European culture. The project will deploy digital technologies to pilot a new crowdsourcing model of scholarly collaboration. Ossian Online will build a multinational online interpretive community through the establishment of a virtual research environment.

The talk will introduce the works of the Ossian canon and describe the desired outcomes of the new project. The work is much discussed but rarely read, so the paper will outline the rationale for returning the focus of Ossianic discourse to the original texts and print culture in which it first appeared. Progress on digitising and encoding major editions from Macpherson’s lifetime (between 1760 and 1773) is ongoing, and plans for completing a new critical edition which will visualise the development of the work’s texts across this period will be discussed.

A central part of Ossian Online will involve building an online research environment to facilitate crowdsourced annotation and interpretation of Ossian, harnessing the interdisciplinary reach and appeal of the work. The project’s ultimate objectives are to use digital technologies to challenge national and disciplinary models of previous literary criticism which have impeded full appreciation of the cultural importance and significance of Ossian. (more…)

Advertisements

Visiting speaker, 19 Nov 2013: Ronan Deazley on comics, copyright and academia

Ronan Deazley (University of Glasgow) will be presenting his paper, ‘Comics, Copyright and Academic Publishing’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 19 November 2013. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 0.31.

Abstract
2013.03.deazleyThis paper explores the culture of copyright clearance within the domain of scholarly communications through the prism of comics scholarship. It will be of interest to copyright scholars, as well as to academics working in the arts, humanities and social sciences who make use of copyright material in their research publications.

About the speaker
CCC_deazleyRonan Deazley is Professor of Copyright Law at the University of Glasgow and Founding Director of CREATe, the RCUK-funded Centre for Copyright and New Business Models in the Creative Economy (www.create.ac.uk). He is the author of numerous publications on the issue of copyright and intellectual property, including On the Origin of the Right to Copy: Charting the Movement of Copyright Law in Eighteenth Century Britain, 1695–1775 (2004) and Re-Thinking Copyright: History, Theory, Language (2006, 2008). Between 2006 and 2008 he was the UK national editor for an AHRC-funded digital resource concerning the history of copyright in Italy, France, Germany, the UK and the US: Primary Sources on Copyright 1450-1900. More recently, he secured £5.1M of RCUK funding to establish CREATe: the RCUK Centre for Copyright and New Business Models in the Creative Economy.

Download a flyer for the talk (PDF).

Visiting speaker, 26 Feb 2013: Nicola Watson on Walter Scott, Washington Irving and literary heritage

Nicola Watson (Open University) will be presenting her paper, ‘Transporting the Romantic: Sir Walter Scott, Washington Irving and the Romantic Writer’s House’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 26 February 2013. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.48.


Abstract

Poster for Nicola Watson's talk.This paper investigates the making of Washington Irving’s house in New York State, Sunnyside, as a reworking of Sir Walter Scott’s exercise in self-promotion at Abbotsford. It argues that Irving, having presented and explicated Scott’s home in Geoffrey Crayon’s Sketchbook to a wide public, especially in the States, consciously took Scott’s house as a model for his own display of himself as a romantic writer. Sunnyside rethinks Abbotsford by sentimental referencing, by reiterating the aesthetic of the collection, and in architectural terms. Most strikingly, it mimics Scott’s fantasia by embedding the writer’s house within a ‘heritage’ landscape itself produced by his own writing. The paper enquires as to how typical this project might have become for other romantic American authors, notably Fenimore Cooper, Henry Thoreau, and Nathaniel Hawthorne. The conclusion speculates on whether the romantic understanding of literary genius as most intensely expressed in houses and associated landscapes survived the Atlantic crossing intact, or whether it mutated into something distinctive in the environment of New England.

(more…)

Marginalia and provenance in the Cardiff Rare Books

Last year the Cardiff Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme (CUROP), an initiative which provides summer placements for undergraduates in the university research environment, helped fund a research project on Marginalia and Provenance in the Restoration Drama texts of the Cardiff Rare Books Collection. This year, another CUROP award helped fund two more undergraduates to undertake research for Dr Melanie Bigold’s on-going project on Marginalia and Provenance in the Cardiff Rare Books. The focus last year was on the 900 volumes of the Restoration Drama Collection. This year, Victoria Shirley and Thomas Tyrrell began to tackle the larger collection. Supported by the staff in Special Collections and Archives (SCOLAR), Victoria and Thomas were able to inspect over 1100 octavo texts with publication dates between 1660 and 1700. More information about visiting SCOLAR and the Cardiff Rare Books can be found here:

More information about CUROP can be found here: http://learning.cf.ac.uk/projects-funding/curop/.

(more…)

Julia Thomas, Shakespeare’s Shrine: The Bard’s Birthplace and the Invention of Stratford-upon-Avon published

The latest book by Dr Julia Thomas, Director of Cardiff’s Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research, has recently been published by the Penn Press. Titled Shakespeare’s Shrine: The Bard’s Birthplace and the Invention of Stratford-upon-Avon, the book considers the Victorian reconstruction of Shakespeare’s birthplace on Henley Street. Here’s the blurb from the book’s webpage over at Penn Press:

Anyone who has paid the entry fee to visit Shakespeare’s Birthplace on Henley Street in Stratford-upon-Avon—and there are some 700,000 a year who do so—might be forgiven for taking the authenticity of the building for granted. The house, as the official guidebooks state, was purchased by Shakespeare’s father, John Shakespeare, in two stages in 1556 and 1575, and William was born and brought up there. The street itself might have changed through the centuries—it is now largely populated by gift and tea shops—but it is easy to imagine little Will playing in the garden of this ancient structure, sitting in the inglenook in the kitchen, or reaching up to turn the Gothic handles on the weathered doors.
     In Shakespeare’s Shrine Julia Thomas reveals just how fully the Birthplace that we visit today is a creation of the nineteenth century. Two hundred years after Shakespeare’s death, the run-down house on Henley Street was home to a butcher shop and a pub. Saved from the threat of an ignominious sale to P. T. Barnum, it was purchased for the English nation in 1847 and given the picturesque half-timbered façade first seen in a fanciful 1769 engraving of the building. A perfect confluence of nationalism, nostalgia, and the easy access afforded by rail travel turned the house in which the Bard first drew breath into a major tourist attraction, one artifact in a sea of Shakespeare handkerchiefs, eggcups, and door-knockers.
     It was clear to Victorians on pilgrimage to Stratford just who Shakespeare was, how he lived, and to whom he belonged, Thomas writes, and the answers were inseparable from Victorian notions of class, domesticity, and national identity. In Shakespeare’s Shrine she has written a richly documented and witty account of how both the Bard and the Warwickshire market town of his birth were turned into enduring symbols of British heritage—and of just how closely contemporary visitors to Stratford are following in the footsteps of their Victorian predecessors.
     Julia Thomas is author of several books, including Pictorial Victorians and Victorian Narrative Painting, and is Director of the Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research at Cardiff University.

More details can be found here.