eighteenth century

Visiting Speaker, 9 Apr 2019: Mark Towsey on David Hume and his Readers

Mark Towsey (University of Liverpool) will be presenting his paper, ‘Reading Hume’s History of England in Britain and America: Readers, Texts and Contexts’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 9 April 2019. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.01, and will be followed by a wine reception. This event is co-hosted with the Cardiff Romanticism and Eighteenth-Century Seminar.

Abstract
2018.06.towseyDavid Hume’s History of England (1754–62) was one of the bestselling books of the eighteenth century, running through a dazzling range of editions and circulating very widely at lending libraries for which records survive. Yet Hume’s History was also a deeply challenging text that scorned cherished ideas of religious history and sought to undermine core facets of British constitutional identity. Drawing on a variety of sources including marginalia, letters, diaries and commonplace books, this paper explores why Hume’s History was so widely read, showing how it was used by readers across the English-speaking world to make sense of a period of rapid change marked by social upheaval at home and revolution abroad. In doing so, it poses important questions about the histories of ideas, education and political culture, while shedding new light on how readers interpreted books in the Georgian age.

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2018/19 Speakers Programme now available

The 2018/19 programme of speakers at the Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research is now available to view on our Events: Speakers Programme page. Talks this session from a range of national and international scholars explore a variety of subjects, including digital culture and the technology of literature, the ghost stories that inspired Frankenstein, book fairs and book societies, and reading history in the 18th century. The talks will be followed by wine reception, and all are welcome!

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Visiting Speaker, 30 Apr 2018: Peter Garside on Walter Scott as a European poet

Peter Garside (University of Edinburgh) will be presenting his paper, ‘Scott As A European Poet: On Editing His Shorter Verse’, at 5.30pm on Monday, 30 April 2017. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 0.31, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
2017.06.garside
The talk will concern preparation for a new scholarly edition of Scott’s Shorter Verse, due to appear next year as the second volume to be published in the Edinburgh Edition of Walter Scott’s Poetry (EEWSP). It will focus on the large proportions of items in this new volume with strong European connections, either in representing translations or reworking of foreign-language texts or more broadly reflecting Scott’s transnational concerns. Consideration will also be given to Scott’s lifelong preoccupation with political affairs on a European scale, and more especially resistance to the forces of Napoleonic ‘universalism’. Lastly, it will offer some tentative suggestions as to how this might (or might not) relate to current debates concerning Brexit.

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2016/17 Speakers Programme now available

The 2016/17 programme of speakers at the Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research is now available to view on our Events: Speakers Programme page. Talks this session from a range of national and international scholars will explore a variety of subjects, including digital literature, Romantic poetry and eighteenth-century drama, book history and modernism, and postmodern fiction. The talks will be followed by wine reception, and all are welcome!

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Paper Castles

Horace Walpole’s Enchanted Castles

Dale Townshend, Tuesday 16 Feb 2016, CEIR Seminar Series

IMG_1177Since the publication of Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto in December 1764, much debate has surrounded the origin of, what has been repeatedly described as, the first gothic novel. In an attempt to pinpoint the real architectural sources of the text’s haunting fortress, Dale Townshend’s paper exposed us to the various literary Gothic localities with which Walpole’s work converses. Yet, it was not until the publication of the second edition of the text in 1765 that Walpole identified his work openly with the gothic tradition, choosing to publish the novel with the sub-title ‘A Gothic Story’. It was also in this publication that Walpole acknowledged himself as the writer of the piece (using the initials ‘H.W.’, revealing that the ‘translator’ of the first edition, William Marshal, was in fact a pseudonym for himself. Much mystery, then, surrounded the publication of the work, leaving readers to question the source of this mysterious story, as well the site of its ghostly location. (more…)