fiction

Visiting Speaker, 12 Dec 2017: Nicky Marsh on Thomas Pynchon and money

Nicky Marsh (University of Southampton) will be presenting her paper, ‘Chasing Dorothy: Gender and Sacrifice in the Work of Thomas Pynchon’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 12 December 2017. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 0.31, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
2017.03.marshThe characters in Thomas Pynchon’s novels, from Gravity’s Rainbow to Against the Day, are constantly trying to catch The Wizard of Oz‘s Dorothy. Yet they never do but when they come close they often realise that it is the wrong Dorothy and in this lingering confusion over who Dorothy really is, I want to suggest, Pynchon points us to the need for a new kind of history for money in early twentieth-century America.  He points us not to the bimetal debates with which the original novella has become so synonymous but to the emergence of credit money and its complex relationship to notions of both gender and sacrifice. This paper follows Pynchon as he follows Dorothy and tries to suggest a language for money that can acknowledge this submerged history.

This talk was originally scheduled for May 2017.

(more…)

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Visiting Speaker, 11 Aug 2017: Bing Jin on Chinese Neo-Victorianism

Bing Jin (University of International Business and Economics, Beijingwill be presenting her paper, ‘Chinese Neo-Victorianism’, at 11.30am on Friday, 11 August 2017. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.47. Please note the change of time and venue.

Abstract
In this lecture, Prof. Bing Jin will offer a complex analysis of the rise, developments and recent trends in the academic study of the neo-Victorian novel in China, with special focus on such authors as A.S. Byatt, John Fowles and Graham Greene. She will also discuss the different assumptions and approaches in contemporary Chinese (Neo)Victorianist scholarship in contrast to that in Britain. (more…)

Reminder: Nicky Marsh on Thomas Pynchon and money tomorrow

2016.08.marsh

New Sensations: Placing Sensation and New Woman Literature

In the first of an ongoing series of posts, Katherine Mansfield, a second-year doctoral candidate based in Cardiff’s Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research, introduces her project: Sensationalising the New Woman: Crossing the Boundaries between Sensation and New Woman literature, 1859–1901. 

Critical discussion regarding Sensation fiction has tended to focus on the genre itself, examining its main themes, such as the devious and criminal wife, and the bigamy and murder plots; in contrast, New Woman studies has placed the genre in relation to other fin-de-siècle movements, for example decadence and first-wave feminism, but has not paid much attention to links with earlier developments. Equally, the first phase of Sensation and New Woman fiction has remained within strict time boundaries; 1860-1880 for Sensation fiction, and 1880–1900 for New Woman literature. In my PhD project I seek to move beyond these limitations to conceptualise and explore the connections between Sensation and New Woman fiction, investigating the extent to which Sensation literature is a forerunner to the early development of the New Woman novel; and consequently how the two genres blur, or cross, temporal and conceptual boundaries. (more…)

Magic, Meaning and Manuscripts

Six Notebooks in Search of an Editor: Samuel Beckett’s Murphy

Andrew Nash, 26 Apr 2016, CEIR Seminar Series

Claiming that he has no critical authority in the field of Samuel Beckett, Dr Andrew Nash (University of Reading) confessed that his paper would shed no new light on Beckett’s writings. The paper was, instead, a thought-provoking account of the changes taking place in manuscript research, the increasing emphasis on the materiality of the manuscript, and the technological conditions (writing instruments and papers) that influence literary production. Nash’s research also provided the centre with an invaluable insight into the status of the modern literary manuscript as an artefact of considerable commercial value, and, in the case of Beckett’s Murphy notebooks, the ways in which the commercial and the scholarly are indelibly intertwined.

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Professor Carl Phelpstead introduces Dr Andrew Nash

In July 2013, the University of Reading successfully purchased at auction six manuscript notebooks, detailing the composition of Beckett’s first novel Murphy (1938). Justifying their bid of £950,000, the University maintained that the acquisition of the manuscript would solidify its reputation as a central archival resource for Beckett’s work, and attract more scholars and researchers to Reading. (more…)