illustrations

CFP: WORD, IMAGE, DIGITAL, Cardiff University, 1 Nov 2016

A One-Day Symposium
Cardiff University, Tuesday, 1 November 2016

Keynote Speaker: Michaela Mahlberg (University of Birmingham)

Download the PDF Here: cfp-wordimagedigital

Cardiff University’s Digital Cultures Network is delighted to announce its first Symposium on Word, Image and the Digital. Word and image, and the interplay between them, remain under explored and under-theorised in the digital humanities, despite the creation of pioneering digital archives including The William Blake Archive, the Rossetti Archive and The Illustration Archive. There is a sense, however, in which the digital is not only ‘graphical’ (as Johanna Drucker reminds us), but also a space where the visual and textual are in constant dialogue.

We invite proposals of up to 300 words for 20-minute papers that explore any aspect of the dynamic between word, image and the digital, including demonstrations of current projects. The deadline for submission of abstracts is Monday, 3 October 2016. Please send proposals or enquiries to Michael Goodman (GoodmanMJ@cardiff.ac.uk). Attendance at the Symposium is free and limited to no more than 30 delegates. While non-speaking delegates are welcome, priority will be given to speakers. (more…)

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2015/16 Speakers Programme now available

Our programme of talks for this academic session is now available, spanning a wide range of subjects and historical periods, while underpinned by intertextual aspects that link them together. Confirmed speakers include:

  • McGill medical lecture theatreNeil Badmington will be discussing Roland Barthes, mourning and Mallarmé
  • Jason Harding considers the convoluted history of Encounter magazine and its CIA sponsors
  • Jennie Batchelor will talk about her Leverhulme-funded research project on The Lady’s Magazine
  • Dale Townshend will present a paper on his AHRC-sponsored work looking at gothic writing and architecture
  • Lisa Stead turns to the early history of cinema writing, which builds on her work on research archives of the interwar materials
  • Mary Hammond‘s talk will look at the tensions disclosed through the regional reception of Dickens’s Great Expectations
  • Andrew Nash will discuss his work on transcribing some of Samuel Beckett’s ms notebooks

We’re also delighted to be co-hosting a public lecture from Prof. Sally Shuttleworth in association with Cardiff’s Collaborative Interdisciplinary Study for Science, Medicine and the Imagination research group. Prof. Shuttleworth’s paper (title TBC) will examine phobias as diseases of modern life.

You can see more details by viewing our Visiting Speakers page.

Click here to download the flyer for the 2015/16 programme (PDF).

Visiting speaker, 18 Nov 2014: Simon Grennan on adapting Anthony Trollope into graphic fiction

Simon Grennan (University of Chester) will be presenting his paper, ‘Dispossession: A New Graphic Adaptation of a Novel by Anthony Trollope’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 18 November 2014. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 0.36.

Abstract
Click here to view a flyer for this talk.This paper will discuss Grennan’s forthcoming adaptation of Anthony Trollope’s John Caldigate (1878) as a new graphic novel, Dispossession. Produced in the context of an academic conference on Trollope in 2015, the new graphic novel functions as a research outcome in the sense that its academic audience is a ‘knowing one’, to use Linda Hutcheon’s term. Following Walter Benjamin’s theorisation of translation, the process of creating Dispossession approaches Trollope’s text as the source of a protocol or set of governing rules, including an apprehension of the reading behaviours of his contemporaries and of contemporary graphic novel readers. As a result, the relationship between novel and graphic novel constitutes both the process and product of adaptation as an experience for a knowing reader. In terms of drawing style, the challenge for this adaptation lies not only in identifying the existing different behaviours of novels and graphic novels, but in meaningfully producing a new style of drawing relative to an existing writing style. It is not the task of comparing existing styles, but one demanding the speculative creation of new rules within which to draw. As Dispossession also has a research function, the process of meaningfully inventing a new style also demands comprehensive rationalisation. From an analysis of Trollope’s style emerges the question of style in the adaptation, answers to which finalise its governing rules: how does Dispossession employ and/or depict equivocation in the style of its facture, distinct from the depiction of the plot? To answer this question, the paper will finally discuss the broader temporal implications of relationships between types of plot and drawing protocols, considering in detail examples of types of facture and storyboarding from 19th-century and 21st-century narrative drawing. (more…)

Visiting speaker, 28 Oct 2014: Ian Haywood on radical medievalism in Victorian Britain

Ian Haywood (University of Roehampton) will be presenting his paper, ‘Illuminating Propaganda: Radical Medievalism and Utopia in Victorian Britain’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 28 October 2014. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 0.36.

2014.01.haywoodAbstract
We usually credit William Morris with the first significant vision of a radical, medievalized Utopia. However, almost half a century before News from Nowhere a Chartist wood engraver named William James Linton produced a remarkable illuminated poem which both textualized and visualized the radical tradition of ‘merrie England’. I will argue that Linton acts as a bridge between the Romantic radicalism of William Cobbett and the socialist revival of the arts and crafts movement. (more…)

Rob Walker, Victorian Cut-out Theatre: Stranger in a strange land

This is the third in a series of occasional posts by writer and filmmaker, Rob Walker, whose YouTube series, ‘Victorian Cut-out Theatre’, celebrates the esoteric, strange and downright weird Victorians by animating contemporary illustrations in the tradition of Monty Python.

‘It is the eve of St George’s Day. Do you not know that to-night, when the clock strikes midnight, all the evil things in the world will have full sway? Do you know where you are going, and what you are going to?’ She was in such evident distress that I tried to comfort her, but without effect. Finally she went down on her knees and implored me not to go; at least to wait a day or two before starting. It was all very ridiculous but I did not feel comfortable. However, there was business to be done, and I could allow nothing to interfere with it. I therefore tried to raise her up, and said, as gravely as I could, that I thanked her, but my duty was imperative, and that I must go. She then rose and dried her eyes, and taking a crucifix from her neck offered it to me. I did not know what to do, for, as an English Churchman, I have been taught to regard such things as in some measure idolatrous, and yet it seemed so ungracious to refuse an old lady meaning so well and in such a state of mind. She saw, I suppose, the doubt in my face, for she put the rosary round my neck, and said, ‘For your mother’s sake,’ and went out of the room.’—Dracula, Chapter 1

This scene from Bram Stoker’s novel, lays the groundwork for terror as Jonathan Harker enters the Carpathian Mountains, hoping to locate the man who hired him. First, however, Harker is introduced to strange food, strange landmarks and even stranger people. The opening of ‘Dracula’ plays a little like a travelogue, as Harker tries his best to reconcile his new surroundings with his ‘modern’ Victorian upbringing. This scene would proliferate hundreds of copycats in horror literature and cinema. We see it adapted in the film Nosferatu (1922), the first screen adaptation of Stoker’s novel. The German solicitor, Hutter, plans to find the castle of Graf Orlok after a short meal at an inn, only to be told by the proprietor that ‘You can’t go any further tonight. A werewolf is roaming the forest.’ It doesn’t matter what language you speak, or culture you’re from, there is always a place where the food tastes funny and the people are strange. We even have a version of this scenario in the American West, where I grew up. It always begins with ‘You ain’t from ’round here, are ya?’ (more…)