intertextuality

Visiting Speaker, 30 Apr 2018: Peter Garside on Walter Scott as a European poet

Peter Garside (University of Edinburgh) will be presenting his paper, ‘Scott As A European Poet: On Editing His Shorter Verse’, at 5.30pm on Monday, 30 April 2017. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 0.31, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
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The talk will concern preparation for a new scholarly edition of Scott’s Shorter Verse, due to appear next year as the second volume to be published in the Edinburgh Edition of Walter Scott’s Poetry (EEWSP). It will focus on the large proportions of items in this new volume with strong European connections, either in representing translations or reworking of foreign-language texts or more broadly reflecting Scott’s transnational concerns. Consideration will also be given to Scott’s lifelong preoccupation with political affairs on a European scale, and more especially resistance to the forces of Napoleonic ‘universalism’. Lastly, it will offer some tentative suggestions as to how this might (or might not) relate to current debates concerning Brexit.

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Visiting Speaker, 12 Dec 2017: Nicky Marsh on Thomas Pynchon and money

Nicky Marsh (University of Southampton) will be presenting her paper, ‘Chasing Dorothy: Gender and Sacrifice in the Work of Thomas Pynchon’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 12 December 2017. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 0.31, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
2017.03.marshThe characters in Thomas Pynchon’s novels, from Gravity’s Rainbow to Against the Day, are constantly trying to catch The Wizard of Oz‘s Dorothy. Yet they never do but when they come close they often realise that it is the wrong Dorothy and in this lingering confusion over who Dorothy really is, I want to suggest, Pynchon points us to the need for a new kind of history for money in early twentieth-century America.  He points us not to the bimetal debates with which the original novella has become so synonymous but to the emergence of credit money and its complex relationship to notions of both gender and sacrifice. This paper follows Pynchon as he follows Dorothy and tries to suggest a language for money that can acknowledge this submerged history.

This talk was originally scheduled for May 2017.

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Visiting Speaker, 11 Aug 2017: Bing Jin on Chinese Neo-Victorianism

Bing Jin (University of International Business and Economics, Beijingwill be presenting her paper, ‘Chinese Neo-Victorianism’, at 11.30am on Friday, 11 August 2017. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.47. Please note the change of time and venue.

Abstract
In this lecture, Prof. Bing Jin will offer a complex analysis of the rise, developments and recent trends in the academic study of the neo-Victorian novel in China, with special focus on such authors as A.S. Byatt, John Fowles and Graham Greene. She will also discuss the different assumptions and approaches in contemporary Chinese (Neo)Victorianist scholarship in contrast to that in Britain. (more…)

Reminder: Nicky Marsh on Thomas Pynchon and money tomorrow

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Paper Castles

Horace Walpole’s Enchanted Castles

Dale Townshend, Tuesday 16 Feb 2016, CEIR Seminar Series

IMG_1177Since the publication of Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto in December 1764, much debate has surrounded the origin of, what has been repeatedly described as, the first gothic novel. In an attempt to pinpoint the real architectural sources of the text’s haunting fortress, Dale Townshend’s paper exposed us to the various literary Gothic localities with which Walpole’s work converses. Yet, it was not until the publication of the second edition of the text in 1765 that Walpole identified his work openly with the gothic tradition, choosing to publish the novel with the sub-title ‘A Gothic Story’. It was also in this publication that Walpole acknowledged himself as the writer of the piece (using the initials ‘H.W.’, revealing that the ‘translator’ of the first edition, William Marshal, was in fact a pseudonym for himself. Much mystery, then, surrounded the publication of the work, leaving readers to question the source of this mysterious story, as well the site of its ghostly location. (more…)