intertextuality

Reminder: Nicky Marsh on Thomas Pynchon and money tomorrow

2016.08.marsh

Visiting Speaker, 9 May 2017: Nicky Marsh on Thomas Pynchon and money

Nicky Marsh (University of Southampton) will be presenting her paper, ‘Gender and Sacrifice in the Work of Thomas Pynchon’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 9 May 2017. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.48, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
2016.08.marshThe characters in Thomas Pynchon’s novels, from Gravity’s Rainbow to Against the Day, are constantly trying to catch The Wizard of Oz‘s Dorothy. Yet they never do but when they come close they often realise that it is the wrong Dorothy and in this lingering confusion over who Dorothy really is, I want to suggest, Pynchon points us to the need for a new kind of history for money in early twentieth-century America.  He points us not to the bimetal debates with which the original novella has become so synonymous but to the emergence of credit money and its complex relationship to notions of both gender and sacrifice. This paper follows Pynchon as he follows Dorothy and tries to suggest a language for money that can acknowledge this submerged history.
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Paper Castles

Horace Walpole’s Enchanted Castles

Dale Townshend, Tuesday 16 Feb 2016, CEIR Seminar Series

IMG_1177Since the publication of Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto in December 1764, much debate has surrounded the origin of, what has been repeatedly described as, the first gothic novel. In an attempt to pinpoint the real architectural sources of the text’s haunting fortress, Dale Townshend’s paper exposed us to the various literary Gothic localities with which Walpole’s work converses. Yet, it was not until the publication of the second edition of the text in 1765 that Walpole identified his work openly with the gothic tradition, choosing to publish the novel with the sub-title ‘A Gothic Story’. It was also in this publication that Walpole acknowledged himself as the writer of the piece (using the initials ‘H.W.’, revealing that the ‘translator’ of the first edition, William Marshal, was in fact a pseudonym for himself. Much mystery, then, surrounded the publication of the work, leaving readers to question the source of this mysterious story, as well the site of its ghostly location. (more…)

Visiting Speaker, 16 Feb 2016: Dale Townshend on Walpole’s Enchanted Castles

Dale Townshend (University of Stirling) will be presenting his paper, ‘Horace Walpole’s Enchanted Castles’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 16 February 2016. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 4.43, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
2015.04.townshendEver since Horace Walpole in the second edition of The Castle of Otranto (1765) disclosed his authorship of his ‘Gothic Story’, it has been assumed that the ‘real’ and ‘particular’ castle to which he, in his guise as the ‘translator’ William Marshal, referred in the Preface to the first edition of the novel was Strawberry Hill, the ‘little Gothic castle’ in Twickenham that he had set about ‘Gothicizing’ since the late 1740s.  As I seek to demonstrate in this paper, however, this is really only half of the story, for while the castle at Otranto certainly, as Walpole would later phrase it, ‘puts one in mind’ of Strawberry Hill, it also looks to the architectural formations of ‘ancient’ or ‘Gothic’ romance for its structure, its effects, and even its eventual disappearance. More specifically, I argue, Manfred’s castle at Otranto is, in a number of respects, a reworking of the trope of the enchanted castle that featured so prominently in the epic romances of Torquato Tasso, Ludovico Ariosto, Edmund Spenser, and others. And if The Castle of Otranto is, indeed, closely linked to Strawberry Hill, I argue that this is not simply because Walpole ‘writes’ his home into his novel, but because both fiction and house looked to the architectural structures of medieval romance as their ultimate point of inspiration. Having explored the trope of the enchanted castle as it figures in The Castle of Otranto and Walpole’s correspondence around Strawberry Hill, I conclude by tracing its uptake in the later Gothic dramas and fictions of Miles Peter Andrews, Clara Reeve, Anna Laetitia Aikin and Ann Radcliffe. (more…)