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Rosie Johns, Publishing in the Modern Era: Interview with Kathryn King, Marketing Manager

This blog post is the fourth post of an ongoing series by Rosie Johns, exploring the challenges and opportunities involved in book publishing in the current 21st Century environment. These posts are being written as part of Rosie’s second project on the Project Management and Research undergraduate module at Cardiff University.

Interview with Kathryn King, Marketing Manager at Policy Press, Bristol

Kathryn King, Marketing Manager at Policy Press

Kathryn King, Marketing Manager at Policy Press

Kathryn King has been the Marketing Manager at Policy Press for six years.  As the head of a four-person Marketing team, she has a diverse range of skills and responsibilities.  The following are extracts from the transcript of my interview with Kathryn on 19th March 2014.

Can you outline your role and responsibilities?

We are a Marketing team of four people and I oversee everything that happens, but between the three main Marketers– there’s an Executive, an Assistant and myself – we each look after different subject areas.  We publish in a variety of areas – social work, social policy, public policy, criminology, social research, public health… So we divide the subject areas between the three of us and more-or-less shadow one, or two in my case, of the Commissioning Editors. We work quite closely with them so there’s a nice handover between the books being commissioned, all the editorial work, and the Marketing team becoming involved. (more…)

Rosie Johns, Publishing in the Modern Era: Interview with John Adler, Part 2

This blog post is the third post of an ongoing series by Rosie Johns, exploring the challenges and opportunities involved in book publishing in the current 21st Century environment. These posts are being written as part of Rosie’s second project on the Project Management and Research undergraduate module at Cardiff University.

The digital revolution in publishing has been gathering pace for nearly two decades now. Back in the late 1990s, many publishers began investing large sums into the development of technology which would enable the digitization of material. Now, in 2014, the eBook is a well-established alternative to the traditional paper-bound product. Consumers are eagerly lapping up this digital material, often at the fraction of the cost of paper copies. Just 33 months after eBooks went on sale at Amazon.com, founder Jeff Bezos gleefully announced that his customers were buying more of the new digital product than its age-old, material alternative.

Book publishing has been turned on its head – the product is changing, the production methods are changing, everything is changing – and publishers, writers and consumers are all (understandably) asking, what does the future hold?

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Rosie Johns, Publishing in the modern era: Introduction

This blog post is the first of a series by Rosie Johns, exploring the challenges and opportunities involved in book publishing in the 21st-century environment.  These posts are being written as part of Rosie’s second project on the Project Management and Research Undergraduate module at Cardiff University.

Introduction

Reading is a near-essential, and vastly enjoyable, part of our lives.  Humans have been creating written records for thousands of years, from the clay tablets of Mesopotamia (accredited as the earliest form of writing, dating back to 3500 BC) to the hardback and paperback books we are familiar with today.

Since the introduction of the Kindle just over five years ago, eBooks have come to represent a new era in publishing – the digital era.  Books are now able to be published without manual labour, without materials and to a limitless quantity.  Publishing companies have begun, and will continue, to develop vastly different technology to adapt to the new digital demands.

This series of blogs will explore the advantages and limitations of the new digital age of book publishing.  I will provide anecdotal accounts, from a student perspective, of all facets of the publishing industry.  Questionnaires and interviews with professionals from all sectors of the publishing industry will be drawn upon to produce a one-of-a-kind resource, which I hope will be far removed from the detached observations made by other blogs, newspapers and studies.

Publishing is a field greatly affected by digital advancement, and the question of what the future holds for book publishing is one that I am keenly interested in, both on an intellectual and personal level.  This blog series seeks to give a detailed and accurate account into publishing and provide answers to questions of interest, regardless of whether (like me) you aspire to enter the field of publishing, or are simply curious about books and how they are produced.

Lucy Ellis, The Kindle: My take on criticism

This blog is part of an ongoing series focused on the Kindle, drawing on the experiences and perspectives of final-year English Literature student, Lucy Ellis. These blog posts are being written as part of Lucy’s first project on the Project Management and Research undergraduate module at Cardiff University.

Part 5

There’s a lot of stuff on the internet about the book in the digital age. Type it into Google and up comes dozens of blogs, articles, interviews – but also various links to academic criticism on the subject. Hiding in the many libraries of Cardiff University is a lot of academic insight on the shift from books to ebooks, newspapers to online articles, including whether there is even a shift at all. (more…)

Lucy Ellis, The Kindle: Self publishing

This blog is part of an ongoing series focused on the Kindle, drawing on the experiences and perspectives of final-year English Literature student, Lucy Ellis. These blog posts are being written as part of Lucy’s first project on the Project Management and Research undergraduate module at Cardiff University.

Part 4

The publishing world is changing.

We’ve all heard of JK Rowling, the author of the Harry Potter series with an estimated fortune worth £560 million. What few people know is before Rowling’s first novel was picked by Bloomsbury in 1996, she received a dozen rejections from other publishers. Considering Rowling is arguably the most successful and wealthiest children’s author in the world, it goes to show just how difficult it is for authors to get their books on the shelves. This is not an isolated story. James Joyce’s The Dubliners (1914) was rejected 22 times, Gone with the Wind (1936) by Margaret Mitchell 38 times, Beatrix Potter was rejected so many times she decided to publish 250 copies of The Tale of Peter Rabbit (1901) herself. (more…)