Romanticism

Speaker, 10 Feb 2020: Joanna Taylor on digital mapping and Dorothy Wordsworth

Joanna Taylor (University of Manchesterwill be presenting her paper, ‘Fitpoet: Walking with Wearables and Dorothy Wordsworth’, at 5.30pm on Monday, 10 February 2020. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.01, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
2019.05.Taylor—and not simply by the fact that this shading of
forest cannot show the fragrance of balsam[.]

The message at the heart of Eavan Boland’s poem, ‘That the Science of Cartography is Limited’, is a straightforward one: that maps are good at representing where something is, but not at showing why it matters. Digital maps exaggerate these limitations. Notwithstanding attempts to represent digitally the experience of standing in a location (Google’s Street View being the most obvious example), digital maps – like their analogue precursors – cannot comprehend an embodied sense of place. This paper seeks to demonstrate incorporating embodied data alongside a literary text in a mapping environment might transform both how we read, and how we understand the role of embodiment in historical and contemporary place-making.

To do so, it takes as a case study one particular text: Dorothy Wordsworth’s epistolary account of her pioneering ascent of England’s highest mountain, Scafell Pike, on 7 October 1818. It reads this letter alongside data gathered from a recreation of this walk—precisely 200 years later—by a party of researchers, artists and mountaineers who followed in Wordsworth’s footsteps. In part, this was a recreation of an important moment in British Romantic literature and mountaineering history. But, as this paper claims, the recreation was also an opportunity to reflect on the relationship between active reading and digital technologies, wherein the maps created by walking this route might transform the ways we read and respond to the texts the initial ascent inspired. The paper’s ultimate claim is that bringing these two types of data—those generated by author and by reader—together can foreground a phenomenology of place that induces new readings both text and map. (more…)

Speaker, 19 Nov 2019: Anna Mercer on the Shelleys and their Manuscripts

Anna Mercer (Cardiff Universitywill be presenting her paper, ‘Manuscripts as Evidence of Collaboration: The Shelleys in 1819’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 19 November 2019. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 0.31, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
2019.02.mercerThis paper considers two texts produced by Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley as evidence of a highly collaborative moment in their literary relationship, and therefore looks beyond their most famous collaboration on Frankenstein (1818). Percy Shelley’s The Cenci and Mary Shelley’s Mathilda are, I argue, ‘sister-works’, particularly in terms of subject matter (dark stories of incest) and with regards to the circumstances of their composition in Italy in 1819. Both productions are influenced by the Shelleys’ mutual fascination with the real history of the Italian Cenci family. My paper shows that by examining the provenance of The Cenci, looking to the manuscript sources and the Shelleys’ process of composition of that drama, a clear case can be made for Mary Shelley’s involvement in her husband’s literary toil during this period. This understanding confirms the reciprocal nature of the Shelleys’ creative exchange, rejecting the (antiquated but persistent) idea that Percy Shelley imposed his ideas on his wife’s first novel Frankenstein, and exploring a more nuanced understanding of the Shelleys as collaborators. In doing so, the paper also seeks to mark 200 years since the composition of The Cenci and Mathilda in 1819. (more…)

2018/19 Speakers Programme now available

The 2018/19 programme of speakers at the Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research is now available to view on our Events: Speakers Programme page. Talks this session from a range of national and international scholars explore a variety of subjects, including digital culture and the technology of literature, the ghost stories that inspired Frankenstein, book fairs and book societies, and reading history in the 18th century. The talks will be followed by wine reception, and all are welcome!

2018.00.speakers

Visiting Speaker, 30 Apr 2018: Peter Garside on Walter Scott as a European poet

Peter Garside (University of Edinburgh) will be presenting his paper, ‘Scott As A European Poet: On Editing His Shorter Verse’, at 5.30pm on Monday, 30 April 2017. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 0.31, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract
2017.06.garside
The talk will concern preparation for a new scholarly edition of Scott’s Shorter Verse, due to appear next year as the second volume to be published in the Edinburgh Edition of Walter Scott’s Poetry (EEWSP). It will focus on the large proportions of items in this new volume with strong European connections, either in representing translations or reworking of foreign-language texts or more broadly reflecting Scott’s transnational concerns. Consideration will also be given to Scott’s lifelong preoccupation with political affairs on a European scale, and more especially resistance to the forces of Napoleonic ‘universalism’. Lastly, it will offer some tentative suggestions as to how this might (or might not) relate to current debates concerning Brexit.

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Reminder: Emily Rohrbach’s talk on voice and dispossession is on later today

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