Victorian literature

Visiting Speaker, 11 Aug 2017: Bing Jin on Chinese Neo-Victorianism

Bing Jin (University of International Business and Economics, Beijingwill be presenting her paper, ‘Chinese Neo-Victorianism’, at 11.30am on Friday, 11 August 2017. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.47. Please note the change of time and venue.

Abstract
In this lecture, Prof. Bing Jin will offer a complex analysis of the rise, developments and recent trends in the academic study of the neo-Victorian novel in China, with special focus on such authors as A.S. Byatt, John Fowles and Graham Greene. She will also discuss the different assumptions and approaches in contemporary Chinese (Neo)Victorianist scholarship in contrast to that in Britain. (more…)

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New Sensations: Placing Sensation and New Woman Literature

In the first of an ongoing series of posts, Katherine Mansfield, a second-year doctoral candidate based in Cardiff’s Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research, introduces her project: Sensationalising the New Woman: Crossing the Boundaries between Sensation and New Woman literature, 1859–1901. 

Critical discussion regarding Sensation fiction has tended to focus on the genre itself, examining its main themes, such as the devious and criminal wife, and the bigamy and murder plots; in contrast, New Woman studies has placed the genre in relation to other fin-de-siècle movements, for example decadence and first-wave feminism, but has not paid much attention to links with earlier developments. Equally, the first phase of Sensation and New Woman fiction has remained within strict time boundaries; 1860-1880 for Sensation fiction, and 1880–1900 for New Woman literature. In my PhD project I seek to move beyond these limitations to conceptualise and explore the connections between Sensation and New Woman fiction, investigating the extent to which Sensation literature is a forerunner to the early development of the New Woman novel; and consequently how the two genres blur, or cross, temporal and conceptual boundaries. (more…)